Why We Do What We Do

Jun 26, 2017 - Doximity Blog


Here at Doximity, we believe that when the whole care coordination team is connected, patient's benefit and the medical sector works better. We vision a future where medical communication is effortless, simple and secure because we want your job to be a tad less stressful.

Thank you for your work. Thank you for your humanity. Thank you for saving lives.

Every week, we share members stories internally on how clinicians have used Doximity in their day to day practice. This is what gets us up every morning.

"Doximity has a unique platform to connect all medical professionals, including medical students and physicians. During one of my rotations in New York, I needed to get in touch with a professional who was at a different institution about a patient he had treated in the past. Unfortunately, the contact information was not posted online. After calling the hospital and attempting to get the contact information for this physician, the administrative staff refused to provide this information over the phone. Ultimately, I was able to find this physician's profile on Doximity, which included his contact information and was able to communicate with him through this approach. The information we obtained did not change the management of this patient, but this example of having a network of professional contacts is a proof-of-concept of why this is critical for communication optimization towards the improvement of patient care."
-Steven He, MD

"I remember getting in a patient from an outside hospital to Emory who was fairly sick and need of immediate surgical attention. We scanned him to find multiple prior surgical procedures with surgically transformed anatomy. The dilemma was that we did not know any of his history or have any prior surgical or imaging records to determine what needed to be done. Prior to Doximity, I would have had to obtain paper consent, fax to multiple hospitals and doctors, and wait for them to eventually fax it over to a machine in the hospital. I have used the Doximity Fax/Mail feature religiously and in my opinion is the greatest feature for information exchange for physicians getting patients treated by multiple different providers with different medical record systems. Within a matter of 30 minutes, I was able to take a picture and fax the consent and electronically obtain records on my phone to review with the surgical team for immediate decision making."
-Amar Patel, MD

You may also check out what users say about our mobile app as well.

Introducing the 2017-2018 Doximity Fellowship Class

Jun 22, 2017 - Doximity Blog


We’re excited to share that Monday, June 19 marked the first day of our 2017-2018 Doximity Fellows Program. In the weeks leading up to the program, we received hundreds of applications from some very impressive candidates. In the end, choosing only a handful sparked debates and tough decisions.

Getting to know the current group was inspiring. It includes clinicians of all walks and in all points in their careers, from med students to retired specialists. There are program directors, blog owners, world travelers, and even CNN Heroes -- everyone doing tremendous amounts to help lives and share their stories.

Thank you to all applicants and to our 2017-2018 Doximity Fellows. We look forward to your involvement and work!

The group consists of, in no particular order:

Name Specialty Institute
Kumar Vasudevan, MD Neurosurgery Emory University School of Medicine
Lauren Shapiro, MD MPH Physical Medicine/Rehab University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Matthew Werger, MD Orthopaedic Surgery Mount Auburn Hospital; New England Baptist
Woosup Michael Park, MD RVT, RPVI Vascular Surgery Cleveland Clinic and Foundation
Joseph DePietro, MD Otolaryngology (ENT) ENT and Allergy Associates, LLP
Robert John Lamberts, MD FAAP Medicine/Pediatrics Dr. Rob Lamberts, LLC
Jonathan Rasouli, MD Neurosurgery Mount Sinai Hospital
Aparna Rama Iyer, MD Psychiatry University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Barbara Lam Med Student Keck School of Medicine of USC
Chiduzie Madubata, MD Cardiology Hahnemann University Hospital
Bhavika Amin, NP Family Nurse Practitioner Arthritis and Osteoporosis Center of Northern Virginia
Helen Lu, NP Family Nurse Practitioner Molina Medical
Piyush Sharma Med Student Saint James School Of Medicine
Derek T. Uemura, MD Emergency Medicine Kuakini Medical Center; John A. Burns School of Medicine of the University of Hawaii
Ankush Bansal, MD FACP, SFHM, FABDA, M.Ht Hospitalist Martin Health System
Berry Pierre, DO Internal Medicine Wellington Regional Medical Center
Jean-Phillip Okhovat, MD Internal Medicine Stanford University School of Medicine
Kate Sully, MD Physical Medicine/Rehab Mayo Clinic
Gregory Apel, MD Emergency Medicine Eisenhower Medical Center
Weston Bettner, MD Gastroenterology University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Valory Wangler, MD Family Medicine Zuni Indian Health Service
Aaron Nelson, MD MBS, FAAP Neurology NYU Langone Medical Center / Bellevue Hospital Center
Timothy Aungst, PharmD Clinical Pharmacist UMass Memorial Medical Center
Edward Chao, DO Endocrinology VA and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine
Shikha Jain, MD Oncology Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Jeffrey Vernon, DO Psychiatry NYU Lutheran Medical Center
John Lazar, MD Thoracic Surgery PinnacleHealth CardioVascular Institute
Hersh Sagreiya, MD Radiology Stanford University School of Medicine
Adam Kadlec, MD Urology Western Michigan Urological Associates
Chokkalingam Siva, MD Rheumatology University of Missouri
Kunal Sindhu, MD Radiation Oncology Beth Israel Hospital
Jerald Winakur, MD Geriatrics UT Health San Antonio
Sameer Avasarala, MD Pulmonology Cleveland Clinic
Diptesh Gupta, MD MRCP (UK) Nephrology Nephrology Specialists of Oklahoma
Mehmet Agirbasli, MD Cardiology Medeniyet University Hospital
Charles Dinerstein, MD MBA FACS Vascular Surgery Surgical Analytics
Harish Kakarala, MD FCCP, FACP Pulmonology NEOMED, Cleveland Clinic
Heather Finlay-Morreale, MD Pediatrics University of Massachusetts Worcester
Bo Liu, MD Radiology Florida Hospital Medical Center
Jasmit Minhas, MD Hospitalist Lahey Hospital and Medical Center
Nisarg Patel Med Student Harvard Medical School
Terri Lynn Major-Kincade, MD MPH Neonat/Perinatology Pediatrix Medical Group of Texas
Valerie Anne Jones, MD Obstetrics & Gynecology Saint Agnes Hospital & Greater Baltimore Medical Center
Daniel Ivankovich, MD Orthopaedic Surgery OnePatient - Global Health Initiative
Vena Vanchinathan, MD Dermatology Apex Dermatology
Shayna Zachary, MD Anesthesiology Mount Sinai Hospital
Kenji Taylor, MD MSc Family Medicine UCSF
Vaibhav Agrawal, MD MBA, MJ, MSHA Hematology Indiana University Simon Cancer Center
Saurabh Sharma, MD Neurology Lahey Hospital and Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine
Savanna Perry, PA Physician Assistant Savannah River Dermatology, LLC
Andrew Stephen Cruz, MD Psychiatry Massachusetts General Hospital
Isuru Jayaratna, MD Urology Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Doximity Point-of-Care CME

Jun 13, 2017 - Doximity Blog


At Doximity, we’re constantly iterating on and building tools to help solve common physician pain points. One of those pain points, we’ve heard, is earning CME. Between attending out-of-state conferences and paying to watch irrelevant clinical videos, there isn’t an easy way to fulfill CME requirements. We hear you. We provide a convenient way for physicians to earn Category 1 CME at no cost. Simply search the clinical topic, read the article, and earn Category 1 CME credits.

No quizzes, no surveys. Simply search, learn and earn.

How is this possible?
The AAPA, ANCC and AANP accept certificates for participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit from organizations accredited by ACCME. Each eligible article earns 0.5 credit and you can earn a max of 30 credit hours in a calendar year.

What do you need to do:

  1. Using the webpage or the Doximity mobile app, search for articles/topics on DocNews tab or search bar.
  2. CME eligible articles feature a orange certificate icon.
  3. All eligible read articles are tracked in Doximity CME Tracker.

720,000 CME credits were earned last year on Doximity. Here's how point-of-care Doximity CME has helped doctors:

“There is so much change happening in health care and I depend on the Doximity articles and discussions to keep up to date on current trends and controversies. Having that knowledge enables me to be a more cognizant clinician and educator. When the Google RSS Reader was sunsetted, I needed a resource to compile all of the journals, newspapers, and magazines that were pertinent to my medical practice. Doximity did a wonderful job filling that void especially with the mobile applications when I'm on the go.”
-Safwan Halabi, MD

"Doximity has allowed me to stay informed on news from medical journals as well as popular media. As I stay abreast of what's written in NY Times and NPR, I can also advise my patients who have read the same articles. The ability to earn CME while staying informed is also a huge benefit. Doximity has the capability of fulfilling much of a physician's needs all with one site.”
-Rose Do, MD

“The Docnews article: "Randomized clinical trial of skin closure by subcuticular suture or skin stapling after elective colorectal cancer surgery" by Kobayashi et al. resulted in me transitioning from skin stapling in my colorectal cancer patients to utilizing subcuticular suture. This was due to the findings of essentially equivocal infection rates but improved patient satisfaction with subcuticular suture. Automatic logging off CME activity is phenomenal.”
-Edward Jones, MD MS

Click here to start earning credits!

About 2017-2018 Residency Navigator

Jun 12, 2017 - Doximity Blog


The goal of Doximity Residency Navigator is to assist medical students in the residency exploration process by providing a transparent look at graduate medical programs.

Here are some frequently asked questions about Residency Navigator:

About this year's Residency Navigator survey

Who is eligible to participate in the surveys?

The residency satisfaction survey is sent to current residents who have completed at least 1 year of residency and recent alumni within 10 years of graduation who are verified Doximity members.

The residency nomination survey is sent to board-certified verified Doximity members.

Can I participate in the surveys more than once?

Board-certified physicians are welcomed to participate in the residency nomination survey every year. However at this time, residents are only allowed to participate in the residency satisfaction survey once. Residents who have taken the residency satisfaction survey before will not be eligible to take the survey again this year.

What is the difference between the two types of surveys?

The residency satisfaction survey asks current residents and recent alumni about several characteristics regarding their residency program experience. All responses are anonymized.

The residency nomination survey permits up to 5 nominations of programs that provide the best clinical training in their specialty, which is then weighted to construct an analysis that is nationally representative of the opinions of board-certified U.S. physicians in that specialty. View research methodology.

When are the opening and closing dates for both surveys?

The nomination survey will be open from May 15th to June 15th, 2017. The satisfaction survey will be open from May 15 until Fall 2017.

When will the 2017-2018 Residency Navigator be released?

Doximity’s 2017-2018 Residency Navigator tool is projected to be launched in late June/early July, 2017.

If I am eligible, how will I receive the Residency Navigator survey?

Eligible physicians can watch their inboxes for a direct link to the survey or can access the survey by logging onto our website, where the survey link (shown below) will appear on the right hand side of your Doximity homepage.

Please email residency@doximity.com if you are still having issues accessing the surveys.

Can I use the Residency Navigator logo when publicizing my residency program?

Yes, you are welcome to use the Residency Navigator logo when publicizing your residency program.

General Residency Navigator Questions

What is Residency Navigator?

The Doximity Residency Navigator is an interactive tool designed to help the medical students research and compare residency training programs nationwide based on their unique career interests. Our latest version includes over 4,000 residency programs spanning 28 specialties, providing medical students a more in depth look at the programs in which they’re interested.

As a program director, how can I make updates to our page?

Add a description: Many programs have chosen to personalize their page by adding a paragraph that highlight special attributes about their institution. Program administrators are welcome to send a description (150 words or less) to be included on their program’s page.

Review data accuracy: We take the accuracy of Residency Navigator data seriously. If you are a program director or coordinator and notice your program information is incorrect or missing, please let us know.

Encourage resident reviews: Your residents can write a review for your program. Eligible residents and recent alumni can contribute reviews for their residency program until Fall 2017. After logging in, eligible residents and alumni will be prompted to complete the Satisfaction Survey on the Doximity homepage.

Contact us
To update your program page with a description, or if you have any other questions, you can reach our Residency Navigator team any time at residency@doximity.com.

For questions about Residency Navigator contact residency@doximity.com and to learn about how hospitals work with Doximity, contact hospitals@doximity.com.

Say Sayonara to Your Hospital Fax Machine

Jun 01, 2017 - Doximity Blog


While faxing might seem like the most obsolete, mundane task, it’s probably not going anywhere anytime soon. It’s still one of the few forms of ‘modern’ communication that counts as HIPAA Compliant. And since clinicians need to fill out an average of 20,000 forms every year, chances are your hospital fax is pretty busy. Where does this leave you - other than waiting by the fax machine?

Ever needed to review a patient’s lab results while out the office? Or waited too long for a prior authorization? With the free Doximity app, you can receive and send faxes from your iPhone or Android. Doximity gives every physician, NP, PA and pharmacist a free, HIPAA-secure efax number. You can electronically fax colleagues and sign documents through the mobile app and website.

How does Doximity's free efaxing work?

  • Fax to and from your iPhone/Android device or computer
  • Send efaxes for free, for life
  • Attach images and documents for secure delivery
  • Date, sign, and annotate documents on-the-go!

Here’s how clinicians are using the free Doximity fax number in their own practice:

“I like being able to receive secure faxes quickly and directly. This was especially handy for my co-worker, because she received a cardiologist's clinic note, which wasn’t shown in a patient's record, when the patient arrived the morning of surgery. Normally we would have to delay or cancel the case.”

“I’ve used my Doximity fax to quickly obtain patient records that led to changing of the patients antibiotics - this process would have taken at least a few days longer using the hospital fax system.”

“It was around 2:15 AM and the Emergency Room asked if I could look at an EKG right away. As the overnight on-call cardiology fellow, one of our responsibilities is to determine whether the cardiac catheterization laboratory needs to be activated for a particular type of myocardial infection, called a STEMI. Our institution had recently been scolded by our administration for "texting" each other photos of EKGs from our smartphone due to the potential for error and HIPAA. Because of this, the ED physician asked me how he could get the EKG to me. Since the ED fax machine is notorious for taking over 10 minutes to transmit a fax, we used Doximity to securely transmit a fax within minutes. No violations, no delay! That patient did need to go to the cath lab urgently. And, the next week, I was able to share the EKG with my colleagues because it was saved on my phone in my Doximity app.”

Claim Your Free Fax Number

Verified Doximity members (physicians, medical students, nurse practitioners and physician’s assistants} are eligible for a free Doximity digital fax line. This is a unique fax number used for both outbound and inbound faxes directly from your Doximity mailbox. Use it to send faxes to any other US fax line.

How to get your free Doximity efax number

  1. Sign in to your Doximity account on the website or the app.
  2. Click the Fax + Mail tab on either the web or in the app.
  3. Add a profile photo, your clinical interests, and your current professional title
  4. Once you complete the above fields, you'll see your digital fax number.

7 Things You Can Do on the Amion App

May 25, 2017 - Doximity Blog


Does your hospital use Amion? Did you know there’s a free Amion App? Download it from the App Store for your iPhone and the Google Play store for your Android smartphone.

Simplify your schedule.
Scheduling doesn’t have to be complicated. See when you’re on call, right from the homepage. If your shifts change, you’ll be quickly notified so you can stay on top of your week.

Customize your calendar view.
See your schedule for the week or month, and color code for easy scheduling. Add and remove schedules to customize your calendar.

Swap shifts with colleagues.
See which of your colleagues are on call and when. You can even swap shifts with them right from the app.

Easily see schedules for multiple hospitals.
If you subscribe to multiple Amion schedules, simply switch between them to see your different schedules.

Make a call or page a colleague.
See who’s currently on call and swiftly page them with the touch of a button. Learn more about the colleagues you’re working with by clicking on their profile, powered by Doximity. Ensure your profile is up to date, so colleagues can learn more about you.

Send HIPAA-secure texts.
Away from your computer? No problem. Communicate with your on-call team safely and securely in the Amion app. You can even snap a photo or send one you’ve already taken. Lock screen message notifications remain confidential and PHI-free, even when you’re away from your phone. Messages are encrypted server-to-server, and are never stored on the device.

Stay connected, even if you have no service or wifi.
No phone connection in the hospital basement? Not to worry. Your schedule is accessible offline in the Amion App, so you can access your schedule wherever you are.

You can download the Amion app from the App Store on your iPhone or from the Google Play store on your Android smartphone. Best of all, it’s free to download!

Can your Network Increase your Net Worth?

May 22, 2017 - Doximity Blog


The importance of networking is often heavily stressed as a professional, no matter the industry. However, traditional networking can be time consuming -- and for the medical community, close to impossible. The unpredictability of on-call schedules and long hours leave little time for networking. Oftentimes, physicians find themselves turning to organized networking events or (uncomfortably forced) mixers.

Thanks to the advent of the internet, physicians can network with anyone, from anywhere. Remember your lab partner from medical school? According to her Doximity profile, you notice that she’s currently Surgeon in Chief at one of the largest heath systems in the United States -- and they’re hiring! Networking may not be so bad, after all.

“My connection with Doximity and the Fellows program has impacted my career and my life as a result. My connection with one of my fellow Fellows led directly to a new job opportunity near my hometown. Without Doximity this would not have been possible.”
-Lamont Hunter, PA-C, MPH

“After CME tracking, Doximity's next biggest impact has been on my networking abilities. Instead of looking through old emails, Googling, or friending people of Facebook, Doximity makes it easy to learn what my old classmates and co-residents are doing, where they are living, and who we know in common. With such a large portion of physicians represented, it is rare that I wonder about an old colleague that I cannot find via Doximity, and, like most docs, networking is key to my work.”
-Valory Wangler, MD

Look up your alma mater on Residency Navigator to easily find past classmates and see where they ended up and if you have any mutual connections.

Looking to move to San Francisco? It may be time to start leveraging those connections.

Click on each alum’s profile to learn more about their training background, past publications and mutual colleagues. Easily send them a message to initiate a conversation.

Your network is out there. What are you waiting for?

The Jason Seifer “Updog” Memorial Scholarship

May 17, 2017 - Doximity Blog


This past April, we were shocked and saddened to learn of the unexpected passing of our colleague and friend, Jason Seifer. While Jason was a gifted software engineer at Doximity, he was much more than that. He served as a role model, teacher and mentor to thousands of aspiring programmers. Through a video series that he produced prior to Doximity, Jason’s deadpan humor and wry wit brought levity to what could have been a boring subject, and his passion for sustainable code was inspiring to everyone he worked with.

Jason was unparalleled in three unique areas: pristine code, themed photo shoots and groan-worthy puns. In spirit and celebration of Jason, we have set up a need-based scholarship through University of Central Florida, Jason’s alma mater.

The Jason Seifer “Updog” Memorial Scholarship

“Jason was a remarkable man. I've met only a handful of people who had his level of expertise, and another handful of people who made me laugh as often. Jason was the only one in both groups. Most veteran developers are jaded and cynical; Jason was lighthearted and fun every single day. Working with him, learning from his Treehouse videos, and being with him in any capacity was a pleasure.

Jason was unlike any other. He was the best of us. He will be missed.”
-Chris “Woody” Woodrich, Software Engineer

"Jason would've wanted to be remembered for his sense of humor, which can only be shadowed by his ability to teach. Professionally, he taught us software development, but personally and most importantly, he taught us to laugh at life. Nothing is more fitting than a scholarship fund to eternalize him."
-Bruno Miranda, VP of Engineering

“Jason was a true inspiration to myself and our company. He worked on an extensive array of projects and made them look easy. But above all, he was inspirational to work with. He had the patience to teach, the passion to see projects through, and the humor to get you through the roughest of days. We will forever cherish the time he spent working with us at Doximity. He was a real Ruby in the rough.”
-Jey Balachandran, VP, Architect

To contribute the Jason Seifer “Updog” Memorial Scholarship, please visit: https://www.ucffoundation.org/updog

The First Annual Doximity Physician Compensation Report

April 2017

Apr 27, 2017 - Doximity Blog


Today we released our first annual Doximity Physician Compensation Report, the most comprehensive research undertaken to date on physician pay in the United States.

Physicians can access the complete salary map here

Here’s the overview of what we found:

Average Compensation for All Combined Specialties

Interestingly, rural and lower cost cities tended to have higher physician compensation than higher cost areas, such as New York, San Francisco and Chicago.

The top five metro areas in which physicians are paid the highest average annual salary are:

  1. Charlotte, N.C. ($359,455)
  2. Bridgeport, Conn. ($353,925)
  3. Phoenix, Ariz. ($351,677)
  4. Milwaukee, Wis. ($345,831)
  5. Houston, Texas ($345,079).

The bottom five metro areas in which physicians are paid the lowest average annual salary are:

  1. Durham, N.C. ($267,598)
  2. Ann Arbor, Mich. ($272,398)
  3. Baltimore, Md. ($281,005)
  4. Charleston, S.C. ($285,933)
  5. Washington, D.C. ($286,242).

Family Doctors / Primary Care Physicians

Primary care doctors represent the backbone of clinical care in the country, and location is a key determinant of their compensation.
The top five metro areas with the overall highest compensation for primary care providers includes:

  1. Charlotte, N.C. ($285,109)
  2. Bridgeport, Conn. ($279,138)
  3. Minneapolis, Minn. ($272,610)
  4. Indianapolis, Ind. ($270,468)
  5. Phoenix, Ariz. ($268,869)

Gender Gap in Physician Compensation

Nationally, the “gender gap” difference is stark. U.S. women physicians on average earn 26.5 percent less, or in dollar terms, $91,284 less than their male counterparts. Moreover, there is no medical specialty identified in the study in which women earn more than men. As an example, female Neurosurgeons were found earn over $90,000 less on average per year. Also, there is no place in the United States – state or top 50 metropolitan areas – where women out-earn men.

The five largest gender wage gaps are found in:

  1. Charlotte, N.C. (33 percent less or $125,035)
  2. Durham, N.C. (31 percent less or $90,480)
  3. Orlando, Fla. (30 percent less or $107,942)
  4. Pittsburgh, Pa. (30 percent less or $100,956)
  5. Bridgeport, Conn. (29 percent less or $110,582)

The specialties with the largest gender wage gap are:

  1. Pediatric Rheumatology (21 less percent or $45,412)
  2. Gastroenterology (21 percent less or $78,490)
  3. Pediatric Endocrinology (20 percent less or $41,467)
  4. Occupational Medicine (20 percent less or $53,921)
  5. Vascular Surgery (20 percent less or $88,800)

For female physicians, the metro areas in which female physicians are paid the highest average annual salary are:

  1. Minneapolis, Minn. ($290,747)
  2. Phoenix, Ariz. ($290,536)
  3. Milwaukee, Wis. ($287,950)
  4. Indianapolis, Ind. ($281,987)
  5. Dallas, Texas ($278,825).

  • The metro areas in which female physicians are paid the lowest average annual salary are: Durham, N.C. ($205,635); Charleston, S.C. ($219,112); Ann Arbor, Mich. ($225,004); Baltimore, Md. ($226,048); and Washington, D.C. ($227,263).

Our study was drawn from self-reported compensation surveys of over 36,000 full-time, licensed U.S. physicians who practice at least 40 hours per week. The timeframe ranges from late 2014 to early 2017. Responses were mapped across metropolitan statistical areas, and the top 50 were ranked by the number of respondents in the data.

Doximity Reaches Over 70% of U.S. Physicians

Feb 22, 2017 - Doximity Blog


Today, we announced that 70% of U.S. physicians have joined the Doximity network. What have we learned from our community of 800,000 physician members? We've learned that connections count. And physicians can count on their connections. Using Doximity, here are some of the amazing ways doctors have worked together to serve their patients, more efficiently and more effectively than ever before.

J. Michael Hitt, MD: One of my patients was bitten by a Macaque monkey, which is infected with a virus that can produce a lethal encephalitis in humans. Worldwide, there are only a dozen or so experts on this zoonosis, but Doximity allowed me to quickly contact authors of key publications that present information critical to treating this disease. The patient did fine - so did the monkey. Doximity provided me with easy access to experts!


Payal Kohli, MD, FACC: It was around 2:15 am and the UCSF Emergency room called me and asked me if I could look at at EKG right away. As the overnight on-call cardiology fellow, one of our responsibilities is to determine whether the cardiac catheterization laboratory needs to be activated for a particular type of myocardial infection, called a STEMI, in which "every minute counts". The ED physician asked me how he could get the EKG to me. Since the ED fax machine is notorious for taking over 10 minutes to transmit a fax, we were able to use Doximity (as we were both members) to securely transmit a fax within minutes. No violations, no delay! Indeed, that patient did need to go to the cath lab urgently. And, the next week, I was able to share the EKG with my colleagues as it was saved on my phone in my Doximity app.
I remember thinking how happy I was to be a part of Doximity and how those few minutes may have made a difference in that patient's outcome, which was excellent.


Clasina Leslie Smith, MD MS, MA, DABMA: About 2 weeks ago in clinic, I had a patient who urgently needed a retinal specialist. Google searches for physicians tend to yield Yelp-equivalent sites rating doctors and giving very little information without a subscription: it's an inefficient way to search for colleagues. I simply hopped on Doximity in the room with her to see if I could find someone I knew personally. It streamlined the process of finding someone that I trusted because I knew him from medical school and who was located close to the patient's home. I was able to quickly call him through his listed phone number and explain the situation so that she could be seen the next day. The patient, my colleague, and me all benefited from being able to get her taken care of quickly, personally, and professionally.


Anitha Rao, MD MA: We admitted a patient to the Neuro ICU who was seizing continuously for 1 hour. We were clueless on a Saturday, on how to contact the primary neurologist regarding prior seizure meds. Through Doximity we were able to communicate with her physician, and ultimately impact patient care and treatment.


David W Hall II, MD: As a specialist, I work out of 5 different hospitals. Oftentimes, surgeries are delayed or cancelled because surgical clearance documents (i.e., labs, EKGs, Echocardiograms, Chest X-Rays, cardiology office notes) haven’t made it to the surgical pre-operative area in a timely and/or guaranteed manner. By encouraging my patients’ primary care doctors and my anesthesia colleagues to use Doximity, we’ve been able to communicate more effectively and avert unnecessary surgery cancellations, saving time and money for everyone involved, including patients.