WFH Wednesday: Flexible Productivity

Oct 17, 2017 - Doximity Blog


This article originally appeared in Forbes.

It started with my kids’ preschool schedule.

In March of 2010 this tiny idea we had of building a directory for healthcare was starting to grow some legs. We had a name, our alpha app was built, and we secured our Series A funding. Which meant it was time to find an office. It was all very exciting but, admittedly, I was struggling to reconcile the demands of our start-up with the demands of motherhood.

At the time, I taught at my kids’ preschool one morning a week and being a part of their early education meant the world to me. But it didn’t work well with my work hours or the fact that the new office was over an hour and half from my home. That’s when we decided to have the entire team work from home on Wednesdays.

Decisions made when a company is 5 people strong do not typically scale to 250 people. But working from home one day a week has both helped this mom (and now many moms and dads at our company) strike a better work-life balance and has become integral to Doximity’s success.

At Doximity, Wednesday has become the GSD/GLD Day. On one hand, after two days in the office, often overwhelmed with meetings, the to-do list has likely grown rather than shrunk. Wednesdays are collectively our Get Sh*t Done (GSD) day. It’s the day we tackle tough problems with fewer distractions. For me, that means sitting at my dining room table with printouts of product specs and a red pen. Wednesday also is a Get Life Done (GLD) Day when we schedule teeth cleaning and take the car to the mechanic. For many of us, it’s a day in which we reclaim upwards of three hours of commuting time that can be used way more productively than singing along to the radio in traffic.

Beyond the personal benefits, WFH Wednesday makes the team collectively more productive. There’s a creative energy in face-to-face collaboration that’s difficult to replicate. Some of our best ideas have come from side conversations people jump into walking by another’s desk. After a mid-week break from the commute, people return to the office refreshed an energized. In addition, designating this one day to get life done cuts down on absenteeism on other days, which means we have a full team present all the time.

To make this work, there are two things that are critical. First, the policy has to apply to everyone - the uniformity of WFH Wednesday is an important piece of its success. It helps everyone with their work-life balance, regardless of their family situation.

Second, we are rigorous in measuring productivity and in holding people accountable for it. We group our employees into small teams, and each team is accountable for quarterly goals. These are designed to be hard, and we hit our goals or miss them as a team. This means that it’s nearly impossible to shirk from your responsibilities because the rest of a fairly small team is leaning on you to do your piece.

Flexibility plus accountability is the key to making WFH Wednesday work. While the pros and cons of the policy were not heavily debated in 2010, the decision to keep them has been very purposeful and we have happier, more productive Doxers because of it. Personally, my days of volunteering at my kids’ preschool are well behind me. But once a month I take a break from work on Wednesday and serve hot lunch at my daughter’s middle school. The experience is priceless.

Call patients privately, right from your EHR

Sep 20, 2017 - Doximity Blog


Do you use Epic? We are excited to announce that you can now use Doximity Dialer to place calls from Epic’s mobile app, Haiku!

To use Dialer with Haiku, follow these simple steps:

  1. Ensure you have the latest version of Doximity Dialer & Epic Haiku installed
  2. Open a chart in Epic Haiku and tap on the patient’s phone number
  3. A menu will appear at the bottom. Select “Doximity Dialer”
  4. The Doximity Dialer app will open instantly, ready to call

If you change your mind later, you can always select your personal phone instead from the Epic Haiku settings.

If you do not see the pop-up in your Haiku app, or have any questions about Doximity Dialer, please reach out at support@doximity.com. If you are unsure whether your organization offers the Epic Haiku mobile app, contact your hospital or clinic IT support desk.

Download Doximity Dialer here.

Information Overload: How These Clinicians Keep Up

Sep 15, 2017 - Doximity Blog


It is no question that healthcare professionals are crunched for time. Many clinicians don’t have time to eat between back-to-back patients, let alone stay up-to-date in the latest in clinical research and treatment options. With the explosion of the internet, many clinicians are more overwhelmed with information than ever before. There simply aren’t enough hours in the day! We hear you, and we created Doximity DocNews Digests for this reason.

Each digest is delivered directly to your inbox, and is curated to your specialty -- so you’re only reading what’s most relevant to you. If you’re on the go, you can easily access articles right from your phone. Better yet, certain articles are eligible for Category 1 CME. Talk about saving time!

Here’s what a few Doximity members had to say about how they stay current:

“From my own perspective as a fellow in training, I can say that the Doximity Gastroenterology email digests have provided a helpful and convenient cross-section of current, professionally relevant content that I can use as a stepping-stone for engaging with my clinical work and with senior colleagues in my discipline. Especially during my first year of fellowship, when time is always of the essence, I appreciated the ability to easily review the week’s most significant content, published at a variety of registers.”
-Nitin Ahuja

“In the past I have used Feedly and Google Play Newsstand for my daily digest of news, however this included a large variety of topics and was not specifically filtered to medical content. I have tried to create my own customized list, but have found it difficult to also include recent articles from medical journals of interest. This lead to quite a disconnected and disjointed reading experience, but with Doximity's DocNews I am now able to easily split my World News and Medical News to two simple reading platforms. This is especially helpful as it allows me to spend more time reading rather than searching for important and relevant news.”
-Stefan Mitrasinovic, MD

“What I enjoy most about these curated articles, which deliver healthcare news in a quick and easily digestible format, is that the articles are open for private discussion amongst Doximity users. It is extremely important to hear about the experiences and reactions of other physicians because it allows a broader perspective than what one might have if their opinions and experiences are isolated to their own practice settings and surroundings. Often times, it also gives physicians a sense of solidarity and comfort when they realize that they are not the only ones struggling with a particular issue, even if they themselves are not active and vocal on the discussion boards.“
-Rehan Waheed, MD

It takes less than a year for physicians to buy a home in this county

Sep 11, 2017 - Doximity Blog


As a physician, when it comes to deciding where to live, several factors come into play. But for many doctors, two of the most significant elements may be salary and cost of living. This is especially important for physicians because location can have a great impact on salary. When Doximity released its first compensation report earlier this year, we found that salaries varied widely across the country. For example, an internal medicine physician in San Francisco makes $235,988, while that same physician in Sioux Falls makes $262,248. Combine that with cost of living, and you could potentially have a very different financial quality of life from one state to the next.

To dig into this a bit deeper, we also looked into where it takes the longest and least amount of time to buy a house. Hopefully this data, along with our salary data can help physicians make more more informed decisions when it comes to their career. Here’s a sneak peek of what those housing stats look like for internal medicine physicians:

Where it will take longest amount of time to buy a house:

  1. Nantucket County, MA - 14 years
  2. New York County, NY - 14 years
  3. San Francisco County, CA - 12 years
  4. Marin County, CA - 12 years
  5. San Mateo County, CA - 12 years

Where it will take the least amount of time to buy a house:

  1. Leslie County, KY - less than 1 year
  2. Knox County, TX - less than 1 year
  3. Todd County, SD - less than 1 year
  4. McDowell County, WV - less than half a year
  5. Cochran County, TX - less than half a year

To explore the full compensation map, and search by your specialty and region, visit Doximity Career Navigator.

This app lets clinicians privately reach patients — without *67

Aug 21, 2017 - Doximity Blog


Have you ever needed to call patients when away from the office, only to realize they won't pick up your blocked call? We understand, which is why we created Doximity Dialer. Call patients from your cell phone, display your main office number.

Here's what our users had to say about their experience using Doximity Dialer:

“This app is just plain marvelous! I often make phone calls to patients while doing other things, and before this app I would write numbers on sticky notes and call, but I always used *67 to avoid giving out my cell number via caller ID. The problem is that patients often won’t answer if there is no caller ID listed. This app solves that problem, by now making it look like I’m calling from the main office number. Truly a great tool to make me connect with patients more easily. I love it and I now include this app among my iPhone page of “medical apps.” Thanks for making this excellent product and please continue to support it and keep it going.” -MedicalMoose

“I just started using this today after starting call with a new group where we respond to “mommy pages.” I was tired of dialing *67 then having to leave a message telling parents I would call again and to answer the blocked call. The Dialer is very straightforward to use and the call quality is just like your normal phone. It automatically used my clinic phone number from my Doximity profile but you can also input a different number to display to patients. The patients are answering on the first try now instead of screening the blocked call. I’m sharing it with the residents and others in the group now because it works so smoothly.” -TexasJeremy

“Works like a charm. No more blocked call denials - and my mobile number stays private. Also nice that the patient’s recent call log will show my office number should they need to call back to have me paged/messaged.” -Ruecube

“Love this app! The fact that I can use this app to call patients without *67 makes being on-call so much easier. Patients see the caller ID of the office, a number they recognize and I don’t reveal my personal cell phone number. I no longer risk getting a patient whose phone will not receive a blocked number. This is a must for all physicians who unfortunately have to be on-call.” -Willfromphilly

Download Doximity Dialer here.